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WISTERIA

Before I tempt you all to fall into this dreamscape of wisteria, it seems that this is a debut of our new website blog. I have always wanted to write again (check out this super old dusty childhood blog of mine here) after the launch of Love Limzy Co., I missed the feeling of composing, curating and documenting quality content, but somehow we are all drowned into this fast paced world and Instagram still, seems to be the more preferable choice when it comes to contemporary digital media. I even missed reading some of my favorite blogs.

Do you all still read them?  When are we going to slow down ourselves again?

So pardon me for my rusty writings, I still wish to convey my most honest words in the most authentic way. As wisteria symbolises the first sign of spring, perhaps this seems to be the best unplanned way to reborn my very first post for my brand, my baby, all over again. I must be in my dreams... 



I have longed to uncover this mysterious, Photoshop-like place that has been floating around the internet and my mind for the longest time. With the least information online and hasty planning, as we always did, I dragged my brother Zen and two of my closest friends Chanwon & Gina on a journey to Kyushu Island, the southwest of Japan. Though it is known as Land of Fire for its geographically volcanic structures, it is equally blessed with the most magnificent floralscapes I have ever set eyes on. 


Hidden in the wooded hills south of central Kitakyushu, Kawachi Wisteria Garden (Japaneses: 河内藤园 Kawachi Fuji-en) is famous for its spectacular wisteria flower tunnel and maze. The garden is only open to the public annually during the wisteria blooming season in mid spring and maple leaves in autumn. 

The founder, Masao Higuchi, was impressed with a book he read when he was still an elementary school student. "I want to leave a proof of living in this world from anything." After the post-effects of war subsided in the 60s, he started cultivating wisteria buds in the nursery with his family. He even saved and moved a 120 year old wisteria tree from the neighbourhood that later turned into the construction of Kawachi Reservoir, and that salvation became the first tree of Kawachi Fuji-en. 


Wisteria is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family (yes, they are relatives with green peas) and are native climbing vines of China, Korea and Japan. Popular as ornamental plant, it was later introduced to Europe and the States, and even Australia, hence you might find them familiar blooming along the streets of London, LA or Sydney. Funnily enough, they are extremely beautiful but are equally ambitious climbers and invaders that might damage neighbouring plants, that some countries classify them as potential weeds.

Though I am aware beforehand that its fragrance is notable, I never expected we even got a little light headed and our noses runny while soaking all the lilac goodness in the tunnel. Our visions turned from a kaleidoscope of pale whites, to blush pinks, to vivid purples. Bees were literally buzzing around the vines, keeping themselves as busy as the crowded tourists. 


After a few days of spring drizzling upon our arrival at Fukuoka (where we mainly stayed to day trip to other places in Kyushu), we were blessed with a full bright sun and a peak bloom in the garden. Words could not express how excited I was inside me to witness this unbelievable wonder of nature. It felt so surreal and out of the world standing under this great creation of God. I hope these pictures serve the least justice and a tiny glimpse for you all of this great beauty. All the hours of flight transits, trains exchange and map searching were definitely worth for this tiny flower that mesmerises the biggest part of me.

Wisteria, I declare you a new favorite of mine, and you are a dangerous threat to the ever popular sakura.

And Japan, you are still, as ever amazing. You never disappoint, do you? 




Lilac Dream, made of mattholia and carnation, a latest creation inspired by this trip to Kawachi Wisteria Garden


 

 

More info of Kawachi Wisteria Garden here


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